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Passage of Bill through Parliament
The Bill has to go through several stages  until it is passed.

This is a summary  of the process from Committee Stage in the House of Lords- taken from Parliament UK's Guide to the Passage of a Bill :


Committee stage: House of Lords - a line by line examination of the Bill.Every clause in the Bill is agreed to, changed or removed from the Bill, although this may happen (particularly under a programme order) without debate.
If the Bill has been amended the Bill is reprinted before its next stage.
Once committee stage is finished, the Bill returns to the floor of the House of Commons for its report stage, where the amended Bill can be debated and further amendments proposed.

Report stage (Commons)
All MPs may speak and vote - for lengthy or complex Bills the debates may be spread over several days.
All MPs can suggest amendments to the Bill or new clauses (parts) they think should be added.

Third reading (Commons).
Debate on the Bill is usually short, and limited to what is actually in the Bill, rather than, as at second reading, what might have been included.
Amendments cannot be made to a Bill at third reading in the Commons.
At the end of the debate, the House votes on whether to approve the third reading of the Bill.
As this Bill started in the Commons it goes to the House of Lords for its first reading.

First reading (Lords) is the first stage of a bill’s passage through the House of Lords - usually a formality, it takes place without debate.
First reading of a bill can take place at any time in a parliamentary session.
Once formally introduced, the bill is printed.

Second reading (Lords) is the first opportunity for members of the Lords to debate the key principles and main purpose of a bill and to flag up any concerns or specific areas where they think amendments (changes) are needed.
Second reading debates usually last for a few hours but can sometimes stretch over a couple of days.

Committee stage (Lords) – detailed line by line examination and discussion of amendments takes place.
Usually starting about two weeks after the second reading debate, committee stage generally lasts for up to eight days, but can go on for longer.
If the bill has been amended it is reprinted with all the agreed amendments. At the end of committee stage, the bill moves to report stage (Lords) for further scrutiny.

Report stage  (due 30.09.2020). This usually starts 14 days after committee stage has concluded and can be spread over several days (but is generally shorter than committee stage).
If the bill is amended it is reprinted to include all the agreed amendments. 

Third reading in the Lords is the chance for members to ‘tidy up’ a bill, concentrating on making sure the eventual law is effective and workable – without loopholes.
As this bill began in the Commons, it is sent back after third reading in the Lords for consideration of Lords amendments, or, if there have been no amendments in the Lords, is sent to the monarch for royal assent.
A Bill may go back and forth between each House (‘Ping Pong’) until both Houses reach agreement.

Royal Assent 
When a Bill has completed all its parliamentary stages in both Houses, it must have Royal Assent before it can become an Act of Parliament (law).
Once the Commons and Lords agree on the final version of the Bill, it can receive Royal Assent and become an Act of Parliament (the proposals of the Bill now become law).
In exceptional cases, when the two Houses do not reach agreement, the Bill falls. If certain conditions are met, the Commons can use the Parliament Acts to pass the Bill, without the consent of the Lords, in the following session.

After Royal Assent
The legislation within the Bill may commence immediately, after a set period or only after a commencement order by a Government minister.
A commencement order is designed to bring into force the whole or part of an Act of Parliament at a date later than the date of the Royal Assent.
If there is no commencement order, the Act will come into force from midnight at the start of the day of the Royal Assent.
The practical implementation of an Act is the responsibility of the appropriate government department, not Parliament.
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